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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be up to every detail. bill: and, stephen hayes and marion marsh are coming up to debate the topic you are talking about. stay tuned for that great panel and a big issue here, in the meantime, voters waiting to see what congress does about the expiring tax cuts, both parties divided over whether or not to extend them, to all americans, and, democratic leaders have yet to make a move on the issue and that change -- will that change today, we wonder, molly henneberg, camped out on the hill, what this is democrats' strategy at play. >> reporter: that is what everybody is waiting to see, how the democrats will proceed with this and the nation's most high-profile democrat, president obama, will speak about the bush tax cuts later today. that is what we are given to expect. and, the tax cuts that are -- apply to virtually every taxpayer that are set to expire at the end of the year unless congress acts and the president said he wants to extend the tax cuts for households that make $250,000 or less and, democrats led my harry reid, are trying to figure out how to do that but as yet no bill is
access to skilled psychiatrists, not enough psychotherapy. >> suarez: doctor stephen stahl is an expert in the use of medications for treating mental illness. >> i think that there is a crisis in the delivery of mental health care in the army. i think the overall care that the soldiers were getting for psychological wounds was substandard. >> suarez: a year and a half ago, dr. stahl taught health care providers at fort hood the latest in best practices. just months later, army psychiatrist major nidal hasan allegedly went on a shooting rampage, killing 13 and wounding dozens more. in the aftermath of the killings, it was reported that major hasan was kept on staff in spite of concerns about his abilities because there are so few psychiatrists in the army. dr. stahl says that, while they are understaffed, they are doing heroic work. he says the 34 psychiatrists, psychologists and other counselors at the base are overwhelmed by the demand for their services. besides treating the soldiers in the transition brigade, they also have to provide services to 50,000 to 60,000 other soldiers and t
drinking with jets players last night? >> no. i was at arianna's. >> up next, former car czar stephen rattner and what it took to save america's auto industry. . or the hundred-thousand mile powertrain warranty. over a thousand people a day are switching to chevy. they're not just trading in, they're trading up. qualified lessees can get low mileage lease on this 2011 malibu ls for around one ninety-nine a month. call for details. the switch to chevy starts at chevydealer.com. [ male announcer ] we all need people who will be there for us in life. people who say, "we're with you, no matter what." at wachovia and wells fargo, we're with you, when a house turns into a home... ...when a passion becomes a career... ♪ ...when a relationship turns into a lifetime... and when all the hard work finally pays off. we're with you when you need someone to stand by you. wachovia, wells fargo, and you. together we'll go far. that's why there's lubriderm® daily moisture. it contains the same nutrients naturally found in healthy skin. skin absorbs it better and it lasts for 24 hours. later gator.
of the topics i discussed with supreme court justice stephen breyer, when he stopped by to discuss his new book, "making our democracy work." i love the title of this new book. "making our democracy work." that's not only the title of the book, but your mission. and you believe for that to happen, people need to understand our institutions and be engaged with them. >> yes. >> how do they do it? >> the first step is to know what it is we do. how your legislature works. how your governor works. how your mayors work. >> you also said something of a mystery. that we built up in our tradition, the norm that when the supreme court decides something, the public tends to follow. >> there's a history in this country, of bad events and marvelous events. and over time, it's led to a general acceptance of the court, of having the last word on most constitutional issues, even when they are wrong. >> that was really tested on the idea. when you were sitting on bush v. gore, the 2000 election, you wrote at the time, you were against it. it was a self-inflicted wound that hurt the court. you also point out, an
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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